7 Reasons You Can Blame the Recession on the Nine Billion Names of God

If you are like most people, chances are that the current state of economy is making your stomach churn and yanking on your nerves. While we can’t control what goes up and down in this world (as much as many would love to do so), there may be a way for us to shoulder some responsibility. According to common lore, one man’s name appears nine billion times in Torah scrolls – and every time it does, the recession ends! Here are seven reasons why YOU could have caused the economic downturn.

– You didn’t thank G‑d enough since Thanksgiving: Thanking someone with words or deeds should always come before thanking Him verbally; if you waited until after dinner was over then it seems that His portion went unfinished.

– Your wicked tongue was too active: You should keep your words and deeds in balance, but when you are talking to people more than performing good deeds they become weighed down with negativity.

– When the economy went south, you were still looking for an investment opportunity: G‑d’s promise that he would take care of our needs is true even today; just because we don’t know how He will fulfill it doesn’t mean it won’t happen!

– You didn’t spend enough time on Teshuva (repentance): Our sins create a type of ‘spark’ which causes negative effects – so if we replace them by doing teshuva then the spark fades away from sight and does not have

The Great Recession is the biggest global recession since World War II.

It was a direct result of an economic bubble caused by shifting demographics and deregulation in housing markets—and it may not be over yet!

This blog post covers seven reasons why you can blame the recession on nine billion names of God. The first reason: It’s worth noting that recessions, depressions, and other financial disasters tend to happen when total debt equals 250% or more of GDP. For example, in 1929-1930 before the stock market crash happened during this period US households had reached $100 billion dollars (or about 150%) whereas China currently has 350%. This means that if we do have another big collapse they will have to rely on external sources for their bailouts.

The second reason: If you’ve been following the economic news, you know that a good chunk of GDP is debt-created—in other words, it would not exist without the economy going into debt and getting an ever-larger amount of credit to create new loans.

Third Reason: The recession has also impacted our ability to consume as much energy; meaning that we have less money overall available with which to buy products from China due to lower wages in America and Europe.

Nowadays even people who are employed can’t spend more than they earn because so many people lost their homes or had a major drop in earnings during this recession! \ Fourth Reason: The banking crisis.

Fifth Reason: The world is experiencing the lowest growth rates in decades, and outside of China we’re not seeing any real signs that this will change anytime soon. Sixth Reason: Globalization has impacted our economies to such a degree that it’s now hard for us to find products made locally because so many other countries are competing with our own production levels (eighth reason).

Seventh Reason: As the recession intensified, governments around the globe were forced to turn more heavily on consumers by raising taxes as well as cutting back on essential services like health care and education.”

The Recession is All Your Fault – Seven Reasons You Can Blame the Recession on the Nine Billion Names of God | blog post

experiencing the lowest growth rates in decades, and outside of China we’re not seeing any real signs that this will change anytime soon. Sixth Reason: Globalization has impacted our economies to such a degree that it’s now hard for us to find products made locally because so many other countries are competing with our own production levels (eighth reason). Seventh Reason: As the recession intensified, governments around the globe were forced to turn more heavily on consumers by raising taxes as well as cutting back on essential services like health care and education.”

The global economy continues its slow but steady recovery from one of humanity’s worst recessions ever. However – inside and outside of China – there is little evidence that things will get better anytime soon

– The recession has been going on for four years now and it’s not showing any signs of slowing down. How can you blame the government, banks, or other institutions? Instead, we should all be blaming ourselves because as a culture we are obsessed with success. Why do our baseball cards have statistics printed on them if no one is keeping track? We want to know how many home runs Babe Ruth hit but don’t care about his batting average–which tells us everything about his ability at the plate. And why does everyone always ask “what did you make this year?” when they really mean what was my income last year (or even worse–my net worth). This isn’t just American culture either: in China people are obsessed with economic growth, in Russia people are obsessed with the Moscow Stock Exchange and on Wall Street executives have their bonuses pegged to how well they do at a particular year.

– When we talk about success being measured by money instead of skill or talent, it’s not surprising that when things get tight enough everyone is willing to work for less money–especially since our economy has been built on the idea that labor should be cheap (too bad there aren’t any jobs). And if you think this type of behavior only applies to blue collar workers just look at what happened in Silicon Valley: those who started out as millionaires became billionaires but don’t seem concerned about keeping wages high because why bother? If these guys can make billions then maybe I’ll make millions.

– The mentality that if I don’t make it then someone else will was used to justify the idea of outsourcing jobs overseas–the old “I need someone cheaper than me” line. And while this practice is now on hold, what about all those people who got laid off in recent years and are still trying to find work? What does it say for a society when getting fired means you’re unemployable anywhere because there’s no one willing to pay you as much as your last job paid?

– A culture where success equates money has led many Americans into thinking they can have everything but only at another person’s expense; hence why bankruptcy rates are so high ever since our country became addicted to debt instead of innovation. – “My house is your responsibility.” This was the mantra of the previous generation, and it’s a sad fact that this mindset has only increased with time. Add to this equation debt for college tuition–and how many people have been told they’ll never get their investment back because there are far more applicants than jobs in any given field?–and you’ve got millions of young adults who feel like everything they do just keeps them where they started. – The idea that our country should be responsible for its own ills (with better education systems or easy access to health care) instead of blaming anyone else is part of what makes America great: we take control over our lives instead of always being forced into someone else’s agenda

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By Radhe Gupta

Radhe Gupta is an Indian business blogger. He believes that Content and Social Media Marketing are the strongest forms of marketing nowadays. Radhe also tries different gadgets every now and then to give their reviews online. You can connect with him...

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